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Pyramids and the Ancient World
by Gordon Dalton

Once more I find a communication from Miroslav Provod in my mailbox, the subject being Pyramids.

Miroslav says, "One of the many mysteries of Egyptian pyramids is their situation to the distance about 1500 meters from reservoir borderline of river Nile."

To a man as educated as Miroslav, it should not be a mystery. The solution to the mystery lies in knowing why the pyramids were built. The pyramids were built primarily to facilitate the production of water.

In nature's design, the earth is at the center of a gigantic electrical field. The earth acts as a negative electrode. It is surrounded by the lower atmosphere, which acts as insulating material. The lower atmosphere, in turn, is surrounded by the upper atmosphere, which acts as a positive electrode.

This charge maintains an average voltage of 360,000 volts between the earth and the upper atmosphere. It is estimated that the air around our heads is 200 volts positive with respect to the ground we stand upon. (1)

It is this electrical charge that gives rise to all life on earth. As in all electrical fields, electrons migrate toward the positive charge. In earth's electrical field, electrons migrate from earth's surface into the atmosphere and toward the positive charge in the upper reaches of the atmosphere.

In a previous civilization that was largely destroyed by cataclysmic geological devastation, mankind had developed a technology that used earth's natural electrostatic field to develop within the pyramid a strong negative charge. Their simple circuitry collected migrating electrons around a strong positive charge developed from sensing the atmosphere's positive charge.

With the Egyptian pyramids, the sensor was typically a silver or gold shrouded capstone positioned atop the pyramid. The positive charge sensed by the capstone shroud was conducted to the interior chamber of the pyramid by metallic conductor and deposited onto a gold working that functioned as the positive plate of an electric capacitor or condenser.

The negative charge, when built to strength, forced condensation from the natural moisture to occur at or near the exterior of the pyramid. In this manner the Ancients extracted water from the atmosphere on an as needed basis.

In applying their technology, the Ancients used pyramids, pyramid-like structures, and a host of other structures to capture the electric charge in varying degrees. Some of these structures were huge, the Great Pyramid of Giza being the most striking example. And some were far from consequential, notably the puzzling stone monoliths of Easter Island.

The structures were typically surrounded by an enclosure that formed a reservoir. The reservoir retained the water produced until the facility operator released the water into the Nile to send it downstream to be used for irrigating crops. The water traveled from the reservoir to the Nile through an aqueduct. The distance of about 1500 meters was determined by substrata conditions. The pyramid required a sound base material to support its mass.

(1) Compton's Pictured Encyclopedia, 1964 Edition, Electrical Properties of the Atmosphere.


This page was last updated February 1, 2005.
It was moved May 13, 2010
Copyright © 2005 by Gordon Dalton

home
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Science!??
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Hyde County, South Dakota is the Pin Tail Duck capital of the world. Visit scenic Highmore, SD in 2005!